A SURVEY RESEARCH ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF VOCABULARY LEARNING THROUGH ENGLISH VOCABULARY CORPUS

  • Mahnoor Siddiq Faculty of English, National University of Modern Languages (NUML), H-9/4 Islamabad, PAKISTAN
  • Iqra Maryam Qandeel Arif Faculty of English, National University of Modern Languages (NUML), H-9/4 Islamabad, PAKISTAN
  • Shahzeb Chadhar Shafi Faculty of English, National University of Modern Languages (NUML), H-9/4 Islamabad, PAKISTAN
  • Muhammad Hamzah Masood Faculty of English, National University of Modern Languages (NUML), H-9/4 Islamabad, PAKISTAN

Abstract

Vocabulary learning and teaching is a hard task for English as Additional/ Second/ Foreign Language (EAL/ ESL/ EFL) Learners and teachers respectively. With the advancements in technology, language pedagogy has also adopted new trends. One of the recent trends in vocabulary learning and teaching within language pedagogy. The current study aims at investigating the effectiveness of vocabulary learning through a modern digital technique namely Corpus-Driven learning. For this purpose, a one Million (1M) (1,000,000) words English Vocabulary Corpus (EVC) was extracted from books (20%), magazines (20%), transcript of TV shows (20%), transcript of Movies (20%) and transcript of TV drama serials and shows (20%). All the data was chosen from five (5) native English Language speaking countries including America, Canada, England, Australia and New Zealand. This English Vocabulary Corpus (EVC) was taught for three (3) slots of one (1) credit hour to 100 final year students of BS English Language. A questionnaire was distributed among 100 students of BS English Language between 20-25 years old through online Google Forms after teaching them EVC. The survey questionnaire was according to the demand for research and vocabulary items from the GRE syllabus were taken for teaching. 5-Point Likert Scale was used to collect the responses for 13 close-ended questionnaires in five options including Strongly Agree, Agree, Neutral, Disagree and Strongly Disagree. The results indicated that the English Vocabulary Corps (EVC) was liked by the students to be taught at institutions for teaching vocabulary. EVC produced effective results on cognition as it helped in the better understanding of meanings, particular contexts and multiple contexts of the words. Students were most likely to use EVC in academia for learning vocabulary. EVC is better than the traditional methods of learning vocabulary as it is creative and easy to understand.

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Published
2021-06-07
How to Cite
SIDDIQ, Mahnoor et al. A SURVEY RESEARCH ANALYSIS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF VOCABULARY LEARNING THROUGH ENGLISH VOCABULARY CORPUS. International Journal of Education and Pedagogy, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 2, p. 1-13, june 2021. ISSN 2682-8464. Available at: <https://myjms.mohe.gov.my/index.php/ijeap/article/view/13763>. Date accessed: 24 july 2024.
Section
Articles