Return to Complete Face to Face Learning: Level of Students’ Academic Excitement and Challenges

  • Bb. Girl Archibeth Cardinas - Flamiano

Abstract

After a year of battling the pandemic, schools in areas with fewer cases of COVID-19 and high vaccination rates like the United States of America have reopened and delivered complete face-to-face to minimize learning loss and other adverse impacts on the lives and wellness of learners. This descriptive - correlational quantitative study aimed to determine students' academic excitement and challenges as they return to complete face-to-face instruction. The study further aimed to answer the questions; 1. What is students' level of academic excitement on their return to complete face-to-face? 2. What is the level of students' academic challenges on their return to complete face-to-face? 3. What is the relationship and influence of the students' level of academic excitement to challenges on their return to complete face-to-face? This study used judgmental and purposive sampling to identify the 100 respondents in one middle school in South Carolina, USA. The research instrument was a survey questionnaire conducted through the google form created by the researcher subjected to content validity and reliability review. Students' academic excitement focused on school, teachers, classmates/friends, school activities, and the learning process, while students' academic challenges focused on school norms and expectations, workload, and personal and home factors. Data gathered were statistically analyzed and interpreted through simple frequency count, weighted means, standard deviation, linear regression, and correlation analysis. Results show that students' level of academic excitement is HIGH, while the level of academic challenges is MODERATE. In conclusion, no significant regression or relationship exists between students' academic excitement and challenges as they return face-to-face. Thus, the null hypothesis is accepted. This study will provide timely and relevant information for school reopening and realigning priorities and plans to serve better the center of the educational process – the learner!

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Online link:
https://www2.ed.gov/documents/coronavirus/reopening-2.pdf
Published
2022-05-01
How to Cite
- FLAMIANO, Bb. Girl Archibeth Cardinas. Return to Complete Face to Face Learning: Level of Students’ Academic Excitement and Challenges. Asian Journal of Research in Education and Social Sciences, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 1, p. 317-327, may 2022. Available at: <https://myjms.mohe.gov.my/index.php/ajress/article/view/18114>. Date accessed: 10 dec. 2022.
Section
Articles